Presidents Message June 2016

Presidents Message June 2016

This month after what will surely be an interesting presentation by Candy Glendenning, she will teach her ‘quilt as you go’ technique.  An appealing idea to me.  I’m thinking maybe I would actually be able to quilt as I make my quilt tops instead of waiting until I have the money to quilt by checkbook.  THAT would be quilting as you go to me! 

That thought made me consider my quilting process and how much it really costs to make a quilt (if you are confused by my thought processes, feel lucky; I have to live with them).  My typical quilt is either a large lap size or a queen size.  Let’s go with an average of 80” x 100”.  It probably takes an average of 8 or 9 yards of fabric for the top of the quilt.  We’ll call it 10 yards, just because I want to.  The back will need about 6 yards.  That’s 16 yards at about $12/yard or $194 dollars.  I have to add about 10% for the unplanned extra stuff I find to buy when I go to a quilt shop, so we’ll round it up to $250.  Then there is $6 for thread, $5 for the extra electricity for the air conditioning (hot flashes caused by quilting), and an average of $25 for machine maintenance, oil, drinks, house cleaning and other activities that aren’t done because I’m busy sewing.  Once the top is done, there is quilting to consider.  Do I go with an inexpensive overall pattern or a cool custom job.  The prices can range between $150 and $400 (and probably more).   I’ll say $250 for now.  My average quilt cost is now $536.  Oh boy, I need to ask for a raise in my allowance!

Ok, the plus side.  I have a quilt.  I made it, my family will love it (or, at least, say they do), and I have a bunch of scraps left over.  After 4 or 5 quilts, I have enough scraps to make another quilt. Yes!  That’s a free quilt!  I should have to pay for the hours of enjoyment I get from the process.  Each quilt is worth a Disneyland ticket, at least.  Please don’t tell anyone about that part.  I can’t afford to pay, I spent all my money quilting.

See you at the meeting.

Terry Simon,

President

PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE MAY 2016

PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE MAY 2016

When I was young, the big joke on all the TV sitcoms was the husband who slumped on the couch, shirtless, watching football and drinking beer.

It terrifed me!

Unfortunately, I think I am becoming a version of that. I realized this the other day when I was in my sewing area working madly on a quilt. I have a couple of mismatched dining tables with notebooks and bins all over the place. When I sit at my sewing machine to sew, I take off my right shoe just because it is easier to handle the foot pedal. I frequently take off my left leg because it’s more comfortable. I have a diet soda next to the machine and, maybe, a couple of empties. I have thread all over my tables, the floor, my shirt, my pants and the cats. After looking down at the machine for a while, my hair starts slipping down my face and blocking my eyes. I look sort of like Cousin It. Maybe, in the old days, I would have had to learn about touch-backs, safeties and other football terms so I could talk to my husband. Instead, he is learning new phraseology. If he walks in and there are little pieces of paper and fabric all over the floor, he asks if I’ve been paper-piecing again. He knows about blocks, sashing, four patches and bindings. Oh, my.

So, why am I telling you this? It’s charity sew-in night at our May meeting. I’m just warning you what to expect! I shall endeavor to leave my leg on.

See you at the meeting.

Terry Simon, President

PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE – MARCH 2016

PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE – MARCH 2016

Today, I was looking through my fabric collection.  Unfortunately, I also noticed how many projects I have in a mid-stream status.  That got me thinking about the typical life of one of my projects.  It goes like this.  First, an idea pops into my head.  I have to cogitate on that for a while.  If it still seems interesting, I sit at EQ7 and play with it.

Once I have it sort of mapped out, I look quickly through my stash for fabrics and decide I need to buy something.  That means talking my hubby into driving to the quilt store (For some reason, the DMV requires that I can actually see).  After buying fabric for the project (and maybe a little something extra), I get super excited and sit down and cut and sew and iron.

Eventually, and idea pops into my head for a project and I start cogitating on it.  I’m sure you see the problem here.  I haven’t actually finished the previous project.  Oh well, I just have to work on the new one.  Now, I have a project to put on the stack of UFO’s.

Then, someone says let’s do a UFO challenge.  So I dust it off and put it on my active table.  At the end of the UFO challenge, I move it back to the UFO pile until the next challenge.  I’m sure none of you have this problem!  I will bet the average life of one of my projects is from one to ten years.  How about yours?

See you at the meeting.
Terry Simon, President